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Hi friends
My name is Aravind i am doing my first year MBA. I am very much interested in taking marketing as my elective. Although i am clear about my decision but still my idea is a wague one. I would like to know what are the various sub-fields in marketing for example selling and distribution, crm etc. i would also like to know what are the hottest buzzing sectors in the marketing field.
Please help me by explaining whatever you know. Please do send in your contributions to <aravind.psgim@gmail.com>
regards
Aravind.S
6th April 2006 From India , Coimbatore

Leolingham2000
Management Consultant
RAJA CSN
Consultant
Abhaymehta
Consultant
Rizwan6871
Mba Marketing Student
Aravind S
Management Student
Sorabh Mehta
Computer Professional
+1 Other

marketing subfields

*Marketing Concept.

*Importance of Marketing to Strategic Management and the

Organization Success.

* strategic marketing management

*Understanding the Marketing and Competitors.

* marketing research.

*market forecast.

*The importance of knowing Buyer Behavior.

*consumer behavior

*organizational buyer behavior.

*Marketing Strategy

*Strategic market Planning

*Market Development.

*marketing environments

*marketing strategies

* marketing planning.

*TRADE MARKETING MANAGEMENT

*Marketing Plan.

*developing a marketing plan.

*executing/implementing a marketing plan.

*market segmentation

*market targeting.

*market positioning.

*product marketing

*Channel marketing

*New Product Development & Strategy.

*new product development process.

*new product commercialization.

*Product Pricing Considerations and Approaches.

*pricing principles.

*pricing strategy

*Marketing Logistics

*marketing channels.

*physical distribution.

*Marketing Decision Making

*Marketing Mix.

*promotions

*selling

*publicity

*online marketing

*direct marketing.

*marketing communication

*branding

*advertising

*telemarketing

*test marketing

*product planning

*sales development

*sales planning

*sales organization

*trade marketing

*merchandising

*retail marketing

*customer servicing

*SELF SERVICE MARKETING

======================================

AS PER YOUR COMMENTS ABOUT ''HOTTEST BUZZING''

FIELDS IN MARKETING IN ''INDIA'' ARE

*PRODUCT MARKETING

*RETAIL MARKETING

*TRADE MARKETING

*SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

*BRAND MANAGEMENT

*MERCHANDISE MANAGEMENT

*CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGEMENT

*SELF SERVICE MARKETING

hope this is useful to you

regards

LEO LINGHAM
8th April 2006 From India , Mumbai
dear leo
Thank you for answering my query. I have now decided to get myself focused on retail and fmcg marketing. If you have any information regarding the above fields please do send it to me.
take care
regards
Aravind.S
13th April 2006 From India , Coimbatore
Dear Arvind,

Please Find the various sub fields of Marketing:

SALES MANAGEMENT

ADVERTISING & CORPORATE COMMUNICATION

UNDERSTANDING CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR

MARKET RESEARCH & FORECASTING

STRATEGIC MARKETING

MARKETING WARFARE

PRICING THE PRODUCT

DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT

CRM

SERVICES MARKETING

INDUSTRIAL MARKETING

PHARMA MARKETING

SOCIAL MARKETING

RURAL MARKETING

GLOBAL MARKETING

FINANCIAL SERVICES MARKETING

Dear Arvind , If You want to make your carrier kindly make sure your are clear in your mind what is your GOAL in your carrier .

You can start your carrier with Services Industries to make it big.

SERVICES INDUSTRIES ARE AS FOLLOWS:

BANKS

INSURANCE

RETAIL

HOSPITALITY

CONSULTING

KPO

IT ENABLED SERVICES

IT SERVICES.

The Best Option Currently is Retail which is at Nascent stage and would grow more than any industry in the coming years.

You can also Look at Insurance & Bank in order to get into Consulting Latter.

If you get a Break in McKensy, BCG, Accenture,KSA , Bain & Co., Delloitte or IBM Business Services , it would the best to start with.

All the Best and Remember Marketing is Just COMMON SENSE which is very UNCOMMON.

ABHAY
23rd June 2006 From India , Samalkha
The extensions of marketing has already been provided to you by other people. I must say that be visionary & don't opt anything just for hake of it. Do something unusual & create a niche for yourself. I'm working in Travel trade in sales & can see myself growing into it more further.
24th June 2006 From India , Gurgaon
Hi Arvind,
You seem to have got quite a number of very useful replies. Now if you would like to try your skills on "PRODUCT MARKETING" thro concept selling, just send me a mail. I am at Erode and may be able to help you to get a practical exposure.
S.N.RAAJA
Director (H.R. & Marketing)
M/s Hashprompt group of companies

26th June 2006 From India , Bharat
DIRECT SALES

I WILL GIVE YOU SOME OUTLINE OF THE PROCESS,

HOW YOU WILL SELL TO A CUSTOMER.

STAGE 1 --ESTABLISHING YOURSELF

-how you will introduce yourself to the customer.

-how you will approach the customer

-how you will create interest for the customer

-how you will grab the attention of the customer

-how you will establish rapport with the customers

STAGE 2 --DEVELOPING CUSTOMER NEEDS

-how you will you profile the customer

-how you will define the needs of the customer

-how you will probe the customers

-how you will determine the customer needs

STAGE 3 --PROPOSING YOUR PRODUCT AS SOLUTION

-how you will advocate your solution

-how you will recommend your products as a solution

-how you will sell benefits of your products

-how you will motivate the customer to make a decision in your favour

STAGE 4 --HANDLING OBJECTIONS

-how you will manage cutomer resistance

-how you will handle the customer objections

STAGE 5 - CLOSE THE SALES

-how you will seek customer commitment

-how you will help the customer to close the sale.

-how you will take the order.

================================================== =====

================================================== =======

Telesales Agenda

Professional telephone techniques.

Projecting a professional image;

making effective outgoing calls;

building rapport;

voice presentation skills;

creating good first impressions on both internal and external calls.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Why customers buy.

Customer transition and the psychology of buying;

how to match sales with customer needs and wants;

creating powerful ‘attention-getters’ designed specifically to improve the positioning of your products and organisation with the customer.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Opening the call.

How to create impact and capture the customers interest in the first few vital seconds of the call.

Developing high impact statements and questions that keep you in control and make the customer want to listen to you.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Questioning techniques and need finding.

Using open and closed questions to uncover real customer needs.

Using questions to discover problems and create value in solutions provided by your product.

Active listening techniques; hearing the whole picture.

Paraphrasing and summarising needs as a transition to selling the benefits of your product.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Benefit selling.

Adding value to your product;

how to present both known and unknown benefits.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Closing skills.

Watch for Buying Signals.

Closing with confidence and recognising when to close the client .

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Handling objections.

Understanding the types of objection; dealing with objections effectively; overcoming the gate-keeper; keeping control during a call.

Selling value. How to increase the 'average value' of each order by selling the value that matches customer needs

Cross Selling

================================================== ===========

Manage Post-Call Activities

* Keeping records and promises

* Meeting deadlines

* Managing the Customer Relationship

================================================== =========

regards

LEO LINGHAM
11th December 2006 From India , Mumbai
hi arun this is the most exciting field .
1)marketing statergy you should know
2)relevant aspects
3)goal
4)principles of marketing
5)and the most important factor is planning if your sucessful in tht u reach the sky
12th February 2007 From India , Ludhiana
CHANDA,

HERE IS SOME USEFUL MATERIAL.

For MANUFACTURERS/ WHOLESALERS understanding how RETAIL businesses make purchase decisions is critical to their organizations’ marketing efforts.

There are different types of retailers and hence different types of retailer buying decisions.

-small retailers [ one man shop]

-large stores retailers

-large department stores

-chain stores[ selling one types of products like electronic goods]

-large chain stores

etc etc

In some ways understanding the RETAIL business market is not as complicated as understanding the consumer market. For example, in certain business markets purchase decisions hinge on the outcome of a bidding process between competitors offering similar products and services. In these cases the decision to buy is often whittled down to one concern – who has the lowest price.

However, in many other ways RETAIL business buying is much more complicated. For instance, the demand by RETAIL businesses for products and services is affected by consumer purchases (called derived demand) and because so many organizations may have a part in creating consumer purchases, a small swing in consumer demand can create big changes in RETAIL business purchasing. Automobile purchases are a good example. If consumer demand for cars increases many companies connected with the automobile industry will also see demand for their products and services increase . Under these conditions companies will ratchet up their operations to ensure demand is met, which invariably will lead to new purchases by a large number of companies. In fact, it is conceivable that an increase of just one or two percent for consumer demand can increase RETAIL business demand for products and services by five or more percent. Unfortunately, the opposite is true if demand declines. Trying to predict these swings requires RETAIL businesses to not only understand their immediate customers but also the end user.

In the consumer market a very large percentage of purchase decisions are made by a single person. There are situations in which multiple people may be involved in a consumer purchase decision, such as a child influencing a parent to choose a certain brand of cereal or a husband and wife deciding together to buy a house, but most of the time purchases are individual decisions.

The RETAIL business market is significantly different. While single person purchasing is not unusual, especially within a small RETAILER , a significant percentage of RETAIL business buying, especially within larger organizations, requires the input of many. In the marketing literature those associated with the purchase decision are known to be part of a Buying Center, which consists of individuals within an organization that perform one or more of the following roles:

Buyer – responsible for dealing with suppliers and placing orders (e.g., purchasing agent)

Decider – has the power to make the final purchase decision (e.g., CEO)

Influencer – has the ability to affect what is ordered such as setting order specifications

User – those who will actually use the product when it is received

Initiator – any Buying Center member who is the first to determine that a need exists

Gatekeeper – anyone who controls access to other Buying Center members (e.g., administrative assistant)

For marketers confronting a Buying Center it is important to first identify who plays what role. Once identified the marketer must address the needs of each member, which may differ significantly. For instance, the Decider, who may be the company president wants to make sure the purchase will not negatively affect the company’s bottom line while the Buyer wants to be assured the product will be delivered on time. Thus, the way each Buying Center member is approached and marketed to requires careful planning in order to address the unique needs of each member.

Experienced Purchasers

As noted in the discussion of the Buying Center, organizations often employ purchasing agents or professional buyers whose job is to negotiate the best deals for their company. Professional buyers are generally as knowledgeable about the product and the industry as the marketer who is selling to them.

Decision Making Time

Depending on the product, RETAIL business purchase decisions can drag on for an extensive period. The number of people involved in business purchase decisions results in decisions taking weeks, months or even years.

Larger Purchases

For products that are regularly used and frequently purchased, RETAIL businesses will often buy a larger volume at one time. Because of this business purchasers often demand price breaks (e.g., discounts) for higher order levels.

Number of Buyers

While there are several million companies worldwide that operate in the overall RETAIL business market, within a particular market the number is much smaller.

Promotional Focus

For business-to-RETAIL business, marketers the size of individual orders, along with a smaller number of buyers, makes person-to-person contact by sales representatives a more effective means of promotion.

Types of Business Purchase Decisions

Straight Re-Purchase - These purchase situations involve routine ordering. In most cases buyers simply reorder the same products or services that were previously purchased. In fact, many larger companies have programmed re-purchases into an automated ordering system that initiates electronic orders when inventory falls below a certain pre-determined level. For the supplier benefiting from the re-purchase this situation is ideal since the purchaser is not looking to evaluate other products. For competitors who are not getting the order it may require extensive marketing efforts to persuade the buyer to consider other product or service options.

Modified Re-Purchase – These purchases occur when products or services previously considered a straight re-purchase are for some reason now under a re-evaluation process. There are many reasons why a product is moved to the status of a modified re-purchase. Some of these reasons include: end of purchase contract period, change in who is involved in making the purchase, supplier is removed from an approved suppliers list, mandate from top level of organization to re-evaluate all purchasing, or strong marketing effort by competitors. In this circumstance the incumbent supplier faces the same challenges they may have faced when they initially convinced the buyer to make the purchase. For competitors the door is now open and they must work hard to make sure their message is heard by those in charge of the purchase decision.

New Task Purchase – As the name suggests, these purchases are ones the buyer has never or rarely made before. In some ways new task purchases can be considered as either minor or major depending on the total cost or overall importance of the purchase. In either case the buyer will spend considerably more time evaluating alternatives. For example, if faced with a major new task purchase, which often involves complex items, such as computer systems, buildings, robotic assembly lines, etc., the purchase cycle from first recognizing the need to placement of the order may be months or even years.

How Businesses Buy

To cap our discussion of the RETAIL business market we now look at how purchasing decisions are made. Business purchasing follows the five-step buying process :

Need Recognition

Search

Evaluate Options

Purchase

After-Purchase Evaluation.

1. Need Recognition

In a business environment needs arise from just about anywhere within the organization. The Buying Center concept shows that Initiators are the first organizational members to recognize a need. In most situations the Initiator is also the User or Buyer. Users are inclined to identify the need for new solutions (i.e., new products) while Buyers are more likely to identify the need to re-purchase products. But marketers should also understand that more companies are replacing human involvement in re-purchase decisions with automated methods, thus making it more challenging for competitors to replace currently purchased products. In straight re-purchase situations, whether there is human intervention or not, the purchasing process often jumps from Need Recognition to Purchase and little search activity is performed.

As part of this step, a specifications document may be generated that lays out the requirements of the product or service to be purchased. Several members of the Buying Center may be involved in creation of the specifications. For the marketer, establishing close contact with those who draw up the specifications may help position the marketer’s product for inclusion in the search phase.

2. Search

The search for alternatives to consider as potential solutions to recognized needs is one of the most significant differences between consumer and business purchasing. Much of this has to do with an organization’s motive to reduce costs. While a consumer will probably not search hard to save two cents a gallon on gas, a company that has a large fleet of cars or trucks certainly will. In fact, this step in the purchase process is where professional buyers make their mark. The primary intention of their search efforts is to identify multiple suppliers who meet product specifications and then, through a screening process, offer a selected group the opportunity to present their products to members of the Buying Center. Although in some industries, such as chemicals, online marketplaces and auction sites offer buyers another option for selecting suppliers that may not include supplier presentations

For suppliers, the key to this step of the purchase process is to make sure they are included within the search activities of the Buyer or others in the Buying Center. In some instances this may require that a supplier work to be included within an approved suppliers list. In the case of online marketplaces and auction sites, suppliers should work to be included within relevant sites.

3. Evaluate Option

Once the search has produced options, members of the Buying Center may then choose among the alternatives. In more advanced purchase situations, members of the Buying Center may evaluate each option using a checklist of features and benefits sought by the buyer. Each feature/benefit is assigned a weight that corresponds to its importance to the purchase decision. In many cases, especially when dealing with Government and Not-For-Profit markets, suppliers must submit bids with the lowest bidder often being awarded the order, assuming products or services meet specifications.

4. Purchase

To actually place the order may require the completion of paperwork (or electronic documents) such as a purchase order. Acquiring the necessary approvals can delay the order for an extended period of time. And for very large purchases, such as buildings or large equipment, financing options may need to be explored.

5. After-Purchase Evaluation

After the order is received the purchasing company may spend time reviewing the results of the purchase. This may involve the Buyer discussing product performance issues with Users. If the product is well received it may end up moving to a straight re-purchase status thus eliminating much of the evaluation process on future purchases.

FOR MAKING THE BUYING DECISION FOR A PRODUCT ,

THE RETAILERS WOULD CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING:

1.MARKET FACTORS

-what is the market potential for the product [ in that city/area]

-what is the market size

-what are the market characteristics

-who buys the product

-when do they buy

-why do they buy

-how do they buy

-how often do they buy

-how much would the customer pay

etc etc

-----------------------------------------------------------

2.PRODUCT

-what is the quality

-what is the brand

-what are the competitive brands

-what is the packaging

-what is the product positioning

etc etc

-----------------------------------------------------

3.SALES

-what is the annual sales target

-what is the monthly sales target

-what is the target for stock holding

-any sales commission

etc etc

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4.SUPPLY

-what is the supply situation

-what is the minimum quantity to be ordered

etc etc

---------------------------------------------------

5.PRICING

-what is the retail price

-what is the competitive retail price

-what is the list price

-what is the sales tax [ if any ]

-what is the trade discount

-what is the volume discount

-what other incentives

-is there a rebate

-is there annual bonus for performance

etc etc

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6.PROMOTIONS

-what is the company promotion programs

-newspaper

-TV

-radio

-point of sales support program

-merchandising support

-trade spend support for coop. campaign

-retailer identification campaign

-brochures

-catalogue support

etc etc

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7. TRAINING

-staff training [ if technical product]

-sales training for shop floor people ]

etc etc

------------------------------------------------------------------

8. JOINT PLANNING / PROMOTIONS WITH RETAILERS

=============================================

REGARDS

LEO LINGHAM
13th February 2007 From India , Mumbai
HI..friends. right now i'm in my 3rd sem MBA as marketing specialisation fS.R Luthra Institute of Management from Surat. i m looking for a good topic on marketing for winter training project. Can anyone guide me or give me an idea that which is a good topic for marketing for doing winter training.
thanks in advance.
7th November 2007 From India , Ahmadabad

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